SELECT PUBLICATIONS


Sabaoon: Education Methods Successfully Countering and Preventing Violent Extremism. Expanding Research on Countering Violent Extremism.

Peracha, F.N., Khan, R.R., Savage, S. (2016). Sabaoon: Education Methods Successfully Countering and Preventing Violent Extremism. Expanding Research on Countering Violent Extremism. Page 85 – 104. Hedayah and Edith Cowan University, 2016


Increasing Cognitive Complexity and Collaboration Across Communities: Being Muslim Being Scottish

Boyd-MacMillan, E. (2016). Increasing Cognitive Complexity and Collaboration Across Communities: Being Muslim Being Scottish. Journal of Strategic Security (Vol. 9). https://doi.org/10.5038/1944-0472.9.4.1563


Complexity Under Stress: Integrative Approaches to Overdetermined Vulnerabilities

Andrews Fearon, P., & Boyd-MacMillan, E. (2016). Complexity Under Stress: Integrative Approaches to Overdetermined Vulnerabilities. Journal of Strategic Security, 9(4), 11–31. https://doi.org/10.5038/1944-0472.9.4.1557


Integrative Complexity Approaches to Prevention in Education

Savage, S. (2016) “Integrative complexity approaches to prevention in education: the key is to identify the ‘cognitive casualty’ in each extremism context” In White Paper on Bio-Psycho-Social Applications to Cognitive Engagement A Strategic Multi-Layer Assessment (SMA) Periodic Publication, October 2016, Executive Editor: Dr. Jason Spitaletta (JHU-APL).


I SEE! Scotland: Tackling Sectarianism and Promoting Community Psychosocial Health

Boyd-MacMillan, E., Fearon, P., Ptolomey, A., & Mathieson, L. (2016). I SEE! Scotland: Tackling Sectarianism and Promoting Community Psychosocial Health. Journal of Strategic Security, 9(4), 53–78. https://doi.org/10.5038/1944-0472.9.4.1556


An IC Intervention for Post-Conflict Northern Ireland Secondary Schools

Boyd-MacMillan, E., Campbell, C., & Furey, A. (2016). An IC Intervention for Post-Conflict Northern Ireland Secondary Schools. Journal of Strategic Security, 9(4), 111–124. https://doi.org/10.5038/1944-0472.9.4.1558


Preventing Violent Extremism in Kenya through Value Complexity: Assessment of Being Kenyan Being Muslim

Savage, S., Khan, A., & Liht, J. (2014). Preventing Violent Extremism in Kenya through Value Complexity: Assessment of Being Kenyan Being Muslim. Journal of Strategic Security, 7(3), 1–26. https://doi.org/10.5038/1944-0472.7.3.1


Preventing Violent Extremism through Value Complexity: Being Muslim Being British

Liht, J., & Savage, S. (2013). Preventing Violent Extremism through Value Complexity: Being Muslim Being British. Journal of Strategic Security, 6(4), 44–66. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/1944-0472.6.4.3


Head and Heart in Preventing Religious Radicalization

Savage, S. (2013) Head and heart in preventing religious radicalization.
In F. Watts and G Dumbreck (Eds) Head and Heart: Perspectives from Religion and Psychology, Templeton Press.


Religious fundamentalism: An empirically derived construct and multi-cultural measurement scale.

Liht, J., Conway, L. G., Savage, S., White, W., & O’Neill, K. A. (2012). Religious fundamentalism: An empirically derived construct and multi-cultural measurement scale. Archive for the Psychology of Religion


Four Lessons from the Study of Fundamentalism and Psychology of Religion

Savage, Sara. (2011) Four Lessons from the Study of Fundamentalism and Psychology of Religion. Journal of Strategic Security, Volume 4 Issue 4 2011, pp. 131-150. http://dx.doi.org/10.5038/1944-0472.4.4.6

 


Radical Religious Speech: The Ingredients of a Binary World View

Savage, S. and Liht, J. (2009). ‘Radical Religious Speech: The Ingredients of a Binary World View’. In Extreme Speech and Democracy, edited by Ivan Hare and James Weinstein. Oxford: Oxford University Press.


Mapping Fundamentalisms: The Psychology of Religion as a Sub-Discipline in the Understanding of Religiously Motivated Violence

Savage, S. (2008). ‘Mapping Fundamentalisms: The Psychology of Religion as a Sub-Discipline in the Understanding of Religiously Motivated Violence’. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion 30 (1): 75–91.